Lilly Browning

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Lilly Browning is the Hernando County Florida-Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator. Her position is funded under the Water Conservation Department at Hernando County Utilities. The nine principles are as follows: 1.) Right Plant, Right Place 2.) Water Efficiently 3.) Fertilize Appropriately 4.) Mulch 5.) Attract Wildlife 6.) Manage Yard Pests Responsibly 7.) Recycle 8.) Reduce Stormwater Runoff 9.) Protect the Waterfront

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SWFWMD declares phase I water shortage

April 28, 2017 - 16:50

Lilly Browning is the Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

The Southwest Florida Water Management District has declared a Phase One Water Shortage. For the homeowner, this is more or less a warning phase, to prepare you for tighter restrictions if the dry weather continues. But one look around at the brown, crunchy lawns can tell us that we need to start thinking seriously about water conservation.

Florida Friendly Pruning Tips

February 11, 2017 - 11:53

Lilly Browning is the Hernando County Florida Friendly Plant Program Coordinator

It is feeling a bit like springtime. We’ve had a fairly warm winter, and some of our spring plants are going to start blooming early. That puts us all in a mood to freshen up our yards, and start pruning for the coming season. Here are some pruning tips to remember before you pick up those pruning shears:

Florida Friendly Plant of the Week Florida Red Maple, Acer rubrum

October 15, 2016 - 13:49

Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Florida Red Maple, Acer rubrum

Who says Florida can’t have Fall color? There are many plants we can work into our landscape to bring traditional fall color, although sometimes in a non-tradtional way. In the next few articles, we’ll cover what Florida-Friendly trees are deciduous and bring color (not always in the fall, sometimes we have to wait a bit) and Florida-Friendly plants which bring wonderful autumn hues to our landscape.

Florida Friendly Plant of the Week: Tea Olive

August 26, 2016 - 12:13

Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Tea Olive

Tea Olive, Osmanthus Frangrans is an underused shrub that should receive more attention as a landscape plant. This non-native grows well in horticultural zones 8b – 9. Hernando County is in zone 9a. This shrub will grow slowly, but eventually reach 15-30 feet tall and 15-20 feet wide. It likes dry soil, but has a medium drought tolerance. It does well in full to partial sun. It has little to no salt tolerance. This shrub produces small white flowers. This is a background shrub that won’t attract a lot of visual attention, but its wonderful sweet fragrance will certainly get noticed.

Florida Friendly Plant of the Week: Peacock Ginger, Kaempferia spp.

August 11, 2016 - 22:38

by Lilly Browning, Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Peacock Ginger, Kaempferia spp. Is a wonderful plant for those who miss their hostas up north. It has a “hosta look” to it, with its wide leaves and intricate foliage patterns. It is not a native Floridian plant, but it does well in horticultural zones 8-10. Hernando County is in Zone 9a. This nice ground cover grows about 2 feet tall and 1-4 feet wide. It likes dry to partially moist soil and it is a wonderful plant for those party sunny to shady areas in your landscape. It has little to no salt tolerance. It will shoot up small, four petaled purple flowers.

Florida Friendly Plant of the Week: Yaupon Holly

August 11, 2016 - 20:48

Lilly Browning is the Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Yaupon Holly, Ilex vomitoria, is a great native plant that can be used as a shrub or as a small, specimen tree. They have tiny leaves and produce white, spring through summer flowers. The red fruit provides food for wildlife in the late fall and into the winter. It will grow 15-30 feet tall and 6-20 feet wide. They prefer wet or partially moist soil. They enjoy a sunny to partial sunny location in the landscape. They have a high salt tolerance, so it is a plant to think about if you live on the coast.

Rain Gardens to reduce stormwater runoff

August 04, 2016 - 20:07

by Lilly Browning, Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Photo: Rain garden by Rogersoh

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Rain Gardens are a fairly simple and beautiful way to practice Florida-Friendly Principle # 9 – Reduce Stormwater Runoff. What is a rain garden? Well it is not a pond, nor is it a “water garden.” It can almost be more compared to a municipal drainage retention area, although much smaller and much more attractive.

Rain gardens take advantage of the flow of water in your yard, capture it for a short time, and allow that water to infiltrate the soil and promote aquifer recharge.

Florida Friendly Plant of the Week: Yesterday-Today-and-Tomorrow (Tripsacum dactyloides)

July 22, 2016 - 11:12

by Lilly Browning, Hernando County Florida Friendly Landscaping Program Coordinator

Photography by Steve Slater, flickr

Yesterday-Today-and-Tomorrow, Brunfelsia grandiflora, is a vibrant shrub that has fallen out of notice in recent years. Although not native, it is Florida-Friendly and requires little maintenance once established. This plant, which grows in horticultural zones 8b – 11 is a unique addition to your garden. It will grow 7-10 feet tall and 5-8 feet wide. It likes dry soil and will thrive in full sun, partial sun or low light conditions. It has little to no salt tolerance.

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